Fertoz Rock Phosphate (FRP) : Sustainable, Productive, Profitable and Good for the Environment

With the renewed focus on regenerative and environmental sustainability, carbon management and ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) Fertoz would like to discuss it’s efforts in these areas. 

Fertoz provides solutions to environmental issues, sustainable ag production and CO2 reduction.  We also provided full product traceability of our products. Fertoz field trials, research and review of scientific literature have shown the many environmental and sustainable benefits of high quality rock phosphate as outlined in the following bulletin:

This will be the start of a series of work in environmental responsibility, sustainable ag solutions and education and outreach to our customers, partners and investors. 

Natural, Sustainable and Better for the Environment

Fertoz-Phos is a direct mined, crushed, screened, granulated, and transported cost effective alternative to conventional fertilizers. Fertoz-Phos is a sustainable option for organic, regenerative and conventional producers. Fertoz fertilizers are certified organic and have zero chemical additives . Rock phosphate provides extended long-term nutrient release. Reduced leaching and run-off losses from Fertoz Rock Phosphate (FRP) does not impact natural waterways and aquatic ecosystems.

Proven Yield Increases

A thorough review of multiple research studies show substantial yield increases  from rock phosphate compared to no P application. Similarly FRP increased production in numerous field trials.

Rock Phosphate Production Significantly Reduces Carbon Release into the Atmosphere

Conventional phosphate (P) fertilizer production creates 5.6 times more CO2 than rock phosphate (RP) due to its manufacturing processes according to the chart below.

Difference in CO2 emissions between conventional phosphate and rock phosphate

Volume of fertilizer through mining, processing and transportation

For every kg of Rock Phosphate ( RP )  produced, 0.2 kg of CO2 is released

For every kg of conventional P produced, 1.3 kg of CO2 is released

Volume of CO2 released from RP production

Volume of CO2 released from Conv. P production

1 ton

0.2 tons

1.3 tons

30 tons (1 truckload)

6 tons

39 tons

100 tons

20 tons

130 tons

1000 tons

200 tons

1300 tons

*Data supplied to charts are a result of Fertoz’ internal research

It Takes Fewer Acres to Neutralize the Carbon Release from Rock Phosphate

Field crops sequester CO2 from the atmosphere and use it to produce biomass. Assuming average forage production, the number of conventional acres required to be carbon neutral based on plant type and volume of fertilizer used are outlined as follows:

Number of acres required to neutralize CO2 from fertilizer production

Volume of fertilizer applied

Grass (acres)

Alfalfa (acres)

Rock Phosphate

Convent. fertilizer

Rock Phosphate

Convent. fertilizer

1 ton

0.01

0.065

0.005

0.03

30 tons (1 truckload)

0.3

1.95

0.17

1.11

100 tons

1

6.5

0.57

3.71

1000 tons

10

65

5.71

37.14

*Sequestration factors for each crop (volume of CO2 removed from the atmosphere in tons per acre) grass (20 tons/acre), alfalfa (35 tons/acre) Manitoba Forage Council,2008

Yield Increases – Additional Benefit with Organic Fertilizer

Potentially increase returns using Fertoz-Phos on average 500 acre farm seeded to wheat compared to no current fertilization application

Example: Multiple research and field trial data indicate an approximate yield increase of 15% from rock phosphate application compared to no phosphorus application. A 500 acre farm, applying rock phosphate (RP) at 100 kg/acre yields the following crop returns:

 

Wheat

Corn

Alfalfa

Legumes

Yield without P

Yield with RP

Yield without P

Yield with RP

Yield without P

Yield with RP

Yield without P

Yield with RP

Yield

25

29.4

40

47.1

1

1.18

20

23.5

Yield Increase

 

4.4

 

7.1

 

0.18

 

3.5

$/acre return (net)

 

$52.8/acre

 

$56.8/acre

 

$27/acre

 

$35/acre

$ return 500 acres (net)

 

$26,400

 

$28,400

 

$13,500

 

$17,500

*Assumed organic grain prices: Wheat ($12/bu), corn ($8/bu), Alfalfa ($150/t), Legumes ($10/bu)

Reduce your Carbon Footprint with FRP

There is a growing concern around high CO2 emissions and effect on climate change. Making your agricultural management practice more sustainable gives the soil opportunity to become a sink for CO2. Choosing fertilizers that reduce CO2 emissions minimize agricultural impacts on climate change. Carbon credits derived from sequestration may be able to be sold via carbon trading platforms, therefor generating additional income stream for farmers.

Replace 20% of your Total Phosphate needs with Rock Phosphate and Reduce CO2 Emissions

Reduce carbon emissions and lower your carbon footprint by using rock phosphate. Start by replacing 20% of your mono-ammonium phosphate, di-ammonium phosphate or triple super phosphate to see extended P availability and long-term soil and environmental benefits.

Difference in CO2 emissions between straight conventional phosphate and 80:20 conventional P: rock phosphate inclusion

Volume of fertilizer through mining, processing and transportation

For every kg of 80:20 (conv. P:RP), 1.04 kg of CO2 is released

For every kg of conventional P produced, 1.3 kg of CO2 is released

A blend of 80:20 reduces CO2 production by 0.26 kg compared to straight conv. P

Volume of CO2 released from in an 80:20 conv.P:RP production

Volume of CO2 released from Conv. P production

Difference

30 tons (1 truckload)

31.2 tons

39 tons

-8.8 tons

100 tons

104 tons

130 tons

-26 tons

1000 tons

1040 tons

1300 tons

-260 tons

Number of acres required to neutralize CO2 from fertilizer production

Volume of fertilizer applied

Wheat (acres)

Corn (acres)

Grass (acres)

Legumes (acres)

Convent.

fertilizer

80:20 P:RP

Convent.

fertilizer

80:20 P:RP

Convent.

fertilizer

80:20 P:RP

Convent.

fertilizer

80:20

P:RP

1 ton

0.26

0.21

0.26

0.21

0.065

0.05

0.13

0.1

30 tons (1 truckload)

7.8

6.24

7.8

6.24

1.95

1.56

3.9

3.12

100 tons

26

20.8

26

20.8

6.5

5.2

13

10.4

1000 tons

260

208

260

208

65

52

130

104

Higher Crop Yields Increase Carbon Sequestration and Reduces Carbon used per bushel of Production

An organic production system can reduce the amount of CO2 per bushel of production by using fertilizer at optimal rates. In the example below, CO2 emissions are reduced by 3 kg per bushel of production using rock phosphate fertilizer over not using any fertilizer at all.

For example:

 

Organic Producer using no fertilizers

Organic Producer using 100 kg Rock Phosphate

Average Yield

25 bu/ac (62 bu/ha)

29 bu/ac (72 bu/ha)

CO2 emitted from 1 ha wheat

1500 kg CO2/ha*

1500 kg CO2/ha*

CO2 emitted from RP production

0 kg CO2 (no RP production)

20 kg CO2/100 kg RP produced

kg CO2 emitted per bu wheat

24 kg CO2/bu

21 kg CO2/bu

*Wheat Carbon Footprint of 1500 kg CO2/ha retrieved from Desjardins et al., 2020.

References

 Manitoba Forage Council. 2008. Forage Technical Bulletin. Impact of alfalfa and fertilizer on pastures: Carbon Sequestration in Pastures. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5c6d9be4797f740e645a4310/t/5ca11037ee6eb01a14b11e46/1554059320273/carbon_sequestration_in_pastures_final_june_26_p.pdf

 R.L. Desjardins1, D.E. Worth1, J. Dyer, X. Verge. The Carbon footprint of agricultural products in Canada. Ottawa Research and Development Center, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada